Resume Tips When You’re Switching Careers

Three Tips for Sprucing up your Resume when Changing Professions

It’s likely that some point in your adulthood you’re going to want to switch careers. Maybe what you thought you wanted to do with the rest of your life wasn’t what you expected, or a sudden life change has made you re-evaluate how you envision your future. Each time you decide to change fields you’ll need to revamp your resume to fit the position you’re applying for. Follow these three tips to spruce up your resume as you change professions.

Focus on skills

Certain job skills are necessary regardless of what field you’re employed in. Highlight these valuable skills on your resume for every position that you apply for. Look at the accomplishments you’ve had in your current career and elaborate on the skills you utilized to get there. Include basic skills such as time management, organization, and communication since they are valuable traits for any position.

Create a captivating opening statement

A general statement about wanting a position in a company is very generic and likely to be overlooked. A well thought out opening statement sets a positive tone for the rest of your resume. Use this as an opportunity to explain a bit about yourself and why the position would be a good fit for you. Think of the skills that you’ll need to work on and highlight your ability to adapt to a new environment with an open mind.

Skip Chronological and create a functional resume

A chronological resume is standard and shows an individual’s work and education history for years. These can be beneficial in some situations, such as when applying for a position in the same field, but changing from one career field to another is more effective with a functional resume. The difference between the two types is that a functional resume examines your experience and skills as they pertain the position. It focuses less on your work history and more on your current accomplishments and what you can bring to the company.

The purpose of your resume is to appeal to the recruiter and secure an interview where you can really showcase your talents. Take extra time to gear your resume in the right direction to increase your chances of making it to the next step and scoring the interview.

The Benefits Working Moms are Getting From Top Employers

When it comes to supporting working parents, the United States is still falling far behind other nations. Even under new legislation, new mothers are still only entitled to less than three weeks of paid leave following delivery; as for paid paternity leave, the U.S. is the only wealthy country that doesn’t offer it at all to new fathers. At Facebook, employees are offered up to four months of paid parental leave following the birth of a child, and its CEO Mark Zuckerberg made waves in 2015 when he announced he would be taking two full months of paid paternity leave, unheard of in the American work force.

From a global perspective, we’re miles behind where we ought to be; however, tech companies are now working to bridge that gap and offer more parental leave for new parents. Working Mother has recently released their 32nd-annual list of the top 100 companies with the best benefits, and the results are telling.

The support that’s being offered to working parents now extends far beyond initial post-delivery care and is helping parents, especially those in high-pressure jobs, manage both their family life and their work life. Several companies at the forefront of the top 100 are offering additional services including support for parents with autism (88% of the top 100), gradually letting new mothers phase back into work (70%), college coaching for high schoolers (63%), and even support for homework (25%).

Companies are also offering more resources to parents for childcare. 92% of the top 100 offer daycare and backup care options or compensation for them during busy times like summer and school holidays.

The most competitive companies are looking for highly skilled employees and, in order to attract them, offering great benefits that extend to not only the employee but their family as well. Subha Barry, senior vice president & managing director of Working Mother Media, discussed how delving deeper and identifying parental needs that extend beyond initial maternity/paternity leave. She notes that businesses are now acknowledging the value of employee retention and are adopting the mindset: “I will pay more, have less in my bottom line, but I will keep my employees.”

The change is also elicited, in part, by the demands of highly skilled millennials. In 2017, approximately a third of companies in the United States expanded their benefit offerings, citing the ‘war for talent’ as the primary factor, according to the 2017 Society for Human Resource Management.

5 Things High-Powered Women Need to Know About Work-Life Balance

You can’t be a perfectionist

There’s a lot of stress for women to have the perfect job and the perfect life. But work, and life, aren’t perfect, and imagining they could be otherwise will only make you more stressed out. If you’re in a high-powered position, you’ve probably learned the importance of not cutting corners. But know when to prioritize, and know when a project isn’t worth the extra time that perfection takes. A finished report is frequently better than a perfect, late one–and no one’s ever complained about homemade brownies that were baked from a boxed mix.

 

Turn off your phone

Keep your work and home life separate by refusing to answer phone calls from the office during your off hours. If necessary, get two phones (or, two phone numbers). Give one number out only to friends and family; give the other out only to coworkers, clients, and other people who might need to contact you for business purposes. Sync your emails, calendars, and apps accordingly. As you move between the workplace and your home life, power down whichever phone is no longer relevant.

And if you’re having a good conversation, watching a cool movie, or enjoying a walk in nature, turn off all your devices and enjoy living in the moment.

 

Exercise

Working out regularly is essential to your mental health, and a great way for you to restore your focus after a busy day at the office.If you don’t like the gym, try hiking, biking, or swimming. Boss level: work exercise into your social life. Go for a run with friends, a long walk with your partner, or a bike ride with your family.

 

Restructure your life

Sometimes your life just doesn’t seem to be working out. You seem to be losing time that you can’t afford to waste, you find yourself tired and lacking the energy to keep moving forward, you feel unmotivated at work or crabby at home. In this case, you may need to look at the structure of your life, and try to find changes that could make it easier.

Is your early-morning makeup routine just an annoying hassle? Simplify your look, and cut down the time you spend working on it. Do you hate to cook? Delegate some of the work, choose simpler recipes, or use a crockpot. Do you find yourself constantly scrolling through social media? Limit your access to those sites, and log off when you leave, so that you won’t feel tempted to quick check later.

 

Make small changes

Sometimes you have to ease your way into big changes in your life. If you never eat dinner with your family, don’t expect to immediately have family dinners every night of the week. Instead, start with just one or two days weekly and commit to those. If you don’t work out, don’t force yourself to spend hours at the gym. Instead, pick just a few days, or come up with a short exercise routine that you can do daily from your home.