How Parents Can Avoid Meltdowns Over the Holidays

As every parent with children knows, meltdowns (especially those in public), become an unwelcome part of life. While it’s normally random when these tantrums will occur, they are most likely to happen during the holiday season. After all, kids who don’t know how to express their emotions yet can become just as stressed as you do this time of year. Whether you’re a new parent or one who just needs some new techniques to try, below you’ll find tips for avoiding those dreaded meltdowns during the holidays.

Prepare for Problems

Whether you’re going to a recital or a friend’s holiday party, packing a “just in case” bag for a meltdown can save you when you need it the most. While what you pack should be based on the personality of your child, some top items to consider bringing along include:

  • Snack and Juice
  • Favorite Toy
  • Paper and Crayons
  • Headphone for Music/Games/Movies
  • Tablet

Monitor Your Schedule

While there might be a lot of holiday parties to attend, bringing your children to too many can upset their normal schedule. While attending a few events is certainly fine, you may want to cut down on the total amount on your calendar. Before making your way out, check to make sure you’re checking the following needs off your list:

  • Is your child fed? Will there be food for them to eat at the party?
  • Will there be a place for your child to sit down and rest while you’re there?
  • When you leave, will your child have enough time to unwind before bed?

Set Expectations

Before going on any type of outing, let your child know what they can expect. This should include going over rules, fun activities, downtime, food, and other important details. This will set their expectations so they can avoid disappointment.

Have a “Can Do” Attitude

Your little one might get upset when they can’t touch all the toys at the store or play in the same room as the adults at a party. So, instead of telling them “no”, why not give them things to do? At the store you could let them pick out the fruit and at the party you could have them help look after a younger child. When you make them feel important, they’re much more likely to keep their cool.